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Hans Rasch

Published July 6, 2017

hans rasch

www.HansRasch.com
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Biography

Since graduating from FSU in 2013, Hans has been based out of New York City where he had finished his MFA as part of the FSU in NYC Dance program under the mentorship of Dr. Sally R. Sommer. He has immersed himself in the dance community of NYC, and maintains and art practice that is focused on Dance as video and installation, and graphic arts. His work often makes references to the series Sailor Moon, Feminist mythology, Queer and Latino culture. He has shared work with audiences at Bureau of General Services–Queer Division, WOW Theater, Queer Abstract, Gibney Dance, Dixon Place, has been an Artist-in-Residence with Otion Front Studios, and performed with Queer Ballet company Ballez in their 2016 Spring season of Sleeping Beauty and the Beast and LaMama Experimental Theater. He currently holds the position of Studio Manager with Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana, the oldest Spanish dance arts company in the US, where he works to develop robust programming with a focus on the percussive and Spanish diasporic art forms.

 Q & A

What did you learn at FSU to get you there?

While at FSU I shifted my focus in my studio practice to be dance-based. I was interested in learning how to use movement and gesture as an effective tool in the communication of my ideas. I was openly embraced by the dance program and given the opportunity to study with the professors in the dance department. It allowed me to combine my interest in the graphic arts and graphic imagery with performative ideas. I also learned that nobody can dictate what and how you learn. You have to take your education into your own hands and really shape it into what you want it to be.

What advice would you give to art students?

Never accept “No”. If you want something, you better be prepared to fight like hell. Professors are there to give you advice, but they don’t have all the answers. Don’t rely to heavily on them; it isn’t fair to either of you. If you really want the artist life, then be willing and ready for anything, because there is no such thing as a straight and narrow road; it’s more of an M.C. Escher drawing.