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Focus Area Templates & Course Descriptions

Beginning Summer C 2012

This applies to all freshman art majors entering the Department of Art Summer C 2012 or later and all incoming transfer art majors as of summer 2013 or later. All BA and BFA students are required to complete the required Foundations courses and one focus area (see templates below), though BFA students are encouraged to complete two focus areas.  Students must declare their focus area by the time they reach 90 credit hours. Please be mindful of prerequisites and co-requisites for advanced courses.

Photography
The photography focus area embraces the use of both traditional and digital technologies, as a means of contemporary image making. Coursework includes both traditional analogue and digital imagemaking by providing a strong foundation in camera technique, photographic chemistry, and printing. These skills are used to concentrate the students own personal ideas and relate them to contemporary photographic art. The faculty are very open to ideas that challenge the boundaries of traditional art photography including installation, new technologies, and multiple media applications.
Required
Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
This course introduces students to lens-formed image production through both liquid (traditional darkroom) and dye processes (digital). It includes image analysis within both critical and historical frameworks. Offered every semester.
Prerequisites:
  • Two-Dimensional Foundations (ART1201C)
  • Digital Foundations (ART1602C)
AND pick FOUR
Experimental Darkroom Photography (ART4929C)
An experimental course in black and white analog photography. Technical instruction covers proper film exposure, development and fine printing. Assignments foster experimentation in artistic aesthetics and the development of the student's technical abilities. The class extends the student's own photographic experimentation by adding the analog possibilities of the darkroom. The class also provides a foundation to the histories, theories, and artists that have influenced the medium. Taught fall and spring semesters. NOTE: Students in this class will be using manual 35mm film cameras. While the student is welcome to use their own camera (or their Grandpa's camera), the school does have film cameras for checkout.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
The Photographic Book as Experience (ART4928C)
In seeing the book as page spreads of horizontal spaces to fill, this class examines the horizontal nature of landscape as a metaphore for image sequencing. Along the way, we will be learning refined digital and analog photographic technique, specific to the needs of individual projects. The ultimate goal of this course is to work experimentally within photography, yet in concert with other media, and to push personal aesthetic boundaries. Offered every other fall.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
Digital/Large Format (ART4929C)
Through further study of digital processes, in conjunction with the use of large format cameras and printers, the primary goal of this class is to push the comfortable aesthetic boundaries of the medium. These new tools provide the opportunity for large-scale photographic installations that can reinterpret the viewer's experience of the photographic image. The studio element of this advanced class is augmented with slide discussions and readings that both question and argue the abilities of the medium. Offered every other spring.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
The Directoral Mode (ART4929C)
This course considers the various ways in which the camera has been used to document ideas and images created specifically for the lens. Conceptual ideas explored will include photography and performance, the studio as stage, time-based investigations, and the isolation of identity in portraiture. Significant technical skills will be explored such as the proper use of a view camera, large format films, photographic studio lighting, and advanced Photoshop skills. Offered every other fall.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
The Photographic Portrait (ART4929C)
Through a study of historic and contemporary portraiture, in photography and other media, the goal of this class is to see how the genre of photographic portraiture is a unique artistic possibility. Class field trips, long-term projects, and exposure to the work of many artists are critical to the course content. Offered every other fall.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
Long-Term Photographic Projects (ART4929C)
This class studies the length of a photographic project, from conception to completion. Concept creation, working process, artistic workflow and output, and final presentation are major elements of the curriculum. Students work on a single project to address each of these areas, aided by the critical feedback of the instructor and peers. Offered every semester.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
Genres in Photography (ART4929C)
This advanced practicum course takes students through the study of a wide range of photographic genres, including how those genres intersect and merge with non-photographic practices. The course is a field study of these genres while at the same time acting as a laboratory for the limits of these genres.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
Advanced Darkroom (ART4929C)
This course explores photography as a creative visual language, through an integration of photography into daily practice, and an investigation of the conceptual use of the medium. With the aid of critiques, slide presentations, videos, and field trips, students develop a sense of personal voice through a larger body of work. Simultaneously, advanced black and white techniques are introduced; including refined exposure and advanced printing skills.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
Nonsilver Photography (ART4929C)
An upper-level photography elective that introduces alternative means of photographic image-making. Topics cover the Photogenic Drawing, Cyanotype, Van Dyke, and Platinum/Palladium printing processes. The course also presents new digital technologies that make it possible to enlarge the contact-print negatives necessary for printing. Strong emphasis is placed on using these processes to strengthen the conceptual ideas suggested by the students’ work.
Prerequisites:
  • Digital and Photographic Imaging (PGY2941C)
Video Art (ART4928C)
Time-based, taps into the history of creating motion-based projects and the present-day techniques of working with computer-based technology - Video and Sound editing.
Prerequisites:
  • Success Strategies (ART1000)
  • Two-Dimensional Foundations (ART1201C)
  • Three-Dimensional Foundations (ART1203)
  • Drawing Foundations (ART1300C)
  • Digital Foundations (ART1602C)
  • Contemporary Art and Design Foundations (ART2204C)
Related Courses
Introduction to Printmaking (ART2400C)
This course is an introduction to relief printing in wood block, linoleum block, and collograph. Offered every semester.
Prerequisites:
  • Two-Dimensional Foundations (ART1201C)
  • Drawing Foundations (ART1300C)
History of Photography (ARH3800)
This large lecture-format course focuses on the development of photography from its inception to its current practice. Through discussions of imagery, and readings of critical writings (from both the original artists and those of critics), students learn the vocabulary and critical arguments necessary to analyze photographic imagery. While individual artists and photographic movements are studied in depth, larger questions will be raised that address (and debate) the uniqueness of the medium. Offered every other fall.
Graduate Seminar: History of Photography (ARH5896)
Within the smaller seminar format, this graduate course explores the contemporary use of portraiture in photography. Topics include subjects such as the structure of celebrity, the individual as represented during war, pornography, and the creation of “otherness”. Writing by authors such as Barthes, Lippard, Sontag, Alloula, Mulvey, Batchen, and Solmon-Godeau are discussed relating to the contemporary experience of the photographic image. Offered every other fall.