Skip to main content

This is your Donation message.

Home » News » Denise Bookwalter: Solo Show Opening at the Print Center 1/22

Denise Bookwalter: Solo Show Opening at the Print Center 1/22

Published January 21, 2015

January 23 – March 28, 2015

Denise Bookwalter: The Knitter’s Hand and the Telegrapher’s Fist

Opening Reception and Gallery Talk
Thursday, January 22, 2015
Gallery Talk: 5:30 pm
Opening Reception: 6:00-8:00 pm

Denise Bookwalter: Solo Show Opening at the Print Center 1/22Denise Bookwalter: The Knitter’s Hand and the Telegrapher’s Fist brings together new prints and artist’s books by the FSU Art professor who is the Director of Florida State University’s artists book press, Small Craft Advisory Press. Bookwalter’s works come out of her extensive research into a wide range of topics, from experimental machines to origami, and take experimental forms based on book structures and packaging.

Denise Bookwalter: Solo Show Opening at the Print Center 1/22Bookwalter’s practice is noted for its intriguing and unexpected approaches to the forms, structures and processes related to book making. Her diverse approaches in recent works have included burning text into the page, creating 3-D models within the pages of a book and utilizing modular systems to construct complex works. At the same time, Bookwalter’s work involves exhaustive research into highly specific subjects, including the biographies of almost-forgotten early aviators. “The disregarded records, figures or facts,” Bookwalter says, “merge and become the atypical moments that facilitate my knowledge of materials, technology and objects. These moments nourish intuition and lead to invention. The combination of research, information and play is the subject of my work.” The title of the exhibition refers to the translation of instructions and codes into handmade objects. “Knitters follow coded knitting patterns but each hand will produce a slightly different object,” Bookwalter says, “When sending telegraphs each operator had a distinct style called the telegrapher’s fist. It is the variation of the human hand in interpreting these codes and languages that inspire my work for this show.”

For more information visit http://www.printcenter.org/